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Jewish Residents of Zolynia

 

  • Katz Family
    The family of Yeshayahu ("Shaya") and Klara Rottenberg Katz. The children are (left to right): Wolf (William), Esther, Abraham and Yetta (baby). Wolf and Abraham survived through a series of concentration camps. After the war, Abraham lived in Israel and William still lives in the United States. Photograph is from the mid-1930s.
  • Jokel Family
    The family of Mordecai ("Markus") Eliezer Jokel and Frymut Sattler Jokel. Mordecai served as a police detective prior to the end of the First World War. By the time this photograph was taken in the 1930s, the Jokels were dependent on their children in the United States. Mordecai and Frymut died of natural causes later in the 1930s. The Jokel children in the back row, left to right: Fay, Moshe, Leibish, Chaskel and Tila. Leibish died in 1935 of tuberculosis. The other four children died at Belzec.
  • Sauer Family (1 of 5)
    Sara Wang Sauer and her husband, Feivel Sauer, residents of Rakszawa. Photograph taken about 1933.
  • Sauer Family (2 of 5)
    These are the children of Sara and Feivel Wang before they left Zolynia for America. Top Row: Fradla (Frieda) Chacha, (Helen). Bottom Row: Yitzak, (Irving) Sabina (Bina), Moshe, (Murry) Rachel (Ruthie).
  • Sauer Family (3 of 5)
    Fradlet Sauer, daughter of Feivel and Sara Sauer and Abraham Apfelbaum of Zolynia. Fradlet emigrated to the United States in 1930 and returned to Zolynia three years later to marry Abraham. They moved back to America, where their names were Albert and Freida Applebaum.
  • Sauer Family (4 of 5)
    Another image of Fradlet and Abraham Apfelbaum
  • Sauer Family (5 of 5)
    Fradlet Apfelbaum
  • Berner, Marder and Jokel
    Feige Berner, her fiance Pinchas Marder, and Tila Jokel, Feige's best friend. The Berners ran a grocery store. By the late 1930s, it was run by Feige's brother, Shmiel. Shmeel and his wife, Fryda, arranged for their youngest daughter, Miriam, to go into hiding during the war. Today Miriam lives in Brooklyn, New York. Her brother, Moishe, was killed with dozens of other Zolynia men during the escape from Gleiwitz in January 1945.
  • Jokel and Marder
    Tila Jokel and her fiancee, Shmiel Marder. Several members of the Marder family were butchers. Tila and Shmiel died at Belzec.
  • Sattler and Jokel
    Ruchta (left) and Sheindel (right) Sattler, daughters of Yeshaya Sattler and Toby Welcz, pose with first cousin Leibish Jokel. The girls and a brother, Yoyna, did not survive during the war. Another brother, Leibish (Louis), had emigrated to New York before the restrictions on immigration.
  • Jokel
    Fay Jokel, photographed not long before the German invasion.
  • Military (1 of 3)
    Chaskel Jokel during military service. The cape indicates that he was part of the Carpathian Mountain division, trained in hill and mountain combat.
  • Military (2 of 3)
    Leibish Jokel wears a cavalry uniform.
  • Military (3 of 3)
    Three of Chaskel Jokel's friends, names unknown, wearing infantry uniforms.
  • Jokel
    Chaskel Jokel. For years, efforts were made to secure a visa for Chaskel to join three siblings in the United States. Unfortunately, the U.S. had severely restricted immigration from Poland. He died at Belzec in 1942.
  • Jokel
    A handwritten note on this photograph indicates that it is Berta Jokel. Relationship to the family is not known.
  • Unknown Zoliner
    A relation of the Jokels. Identity unknown.
  • Wartime Jewish Zoliner? (1 of 3)
    One of three wartime photographs of Jews from the Gmina Zolynia archives. Several Jewish survivors cannot identify the men in these pictures. It is known that the Germans dressed local Jews in "typical" Jewish costumes and used the images in propoganda. Examples exist from other nearby towns. These photographs may not be of Jews from Zolynia, or they may be of Jews who were moved to Zolynia after the August 1942 expulsions. Further investigation will continue.
  • Wartime Jewish Zoliners? (2 of 3)
    One of three wartime photographs of Jews from the Gmina Zolynia archives. Several Jewish survivors cannot identify the men in these pictures. It is known that the Germans dressed local Jews in "typical" Jewish costumes and used the images in propoganda. Examples exist from other nearby towns. These photographs may not be of Jews from Zolynia, or they may be of Jews who were moved to Zolynia after the August 1942 expulsions. Further investigation will continue.
  • Wartime Jewish Zoliner? (3 of 3)
    One of three wartime photographs of Jews from the Gmina Zolynia archives. Several Jewish survivors cannot identify the men in these pictures. It is known that the Germans dressed local Jews in "typical" Jewish costumes and used the images in propoganda. Examples exist from other nearby towns. These photographs may not be of Jews from Zolynia, or they may be of Jews who were moved to Zolynia after the August 1942 expulsions. Further investigation will continue.
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